Types of meditation

Did you know that there are as many meditation techniques as there are sports disciplines?

Different types of meditation have different benefits and qualities. Some of these techniques will work better for you than others – just like sports disciplines or diets. They work in different ways for different people. Everyone has their own preferences and needs, even here among Yogilab members.

The only way to find the best forms of meditation for you is to try some of them out.

We can classify types of meditation in different ways.

Researchers most often classify them based on how and where we focus our attention. According to this approach, we can split the types of meditation into:

01

Focused attention

This type of meditation involves focusing your attention on one object during a meditation session. This object can be the breath, a mantra, a visualized object, a part of the body, an external object, etc. With time and practice, the ability to maintain attention on the chosen object becomes stronger and the distractions become weaker and shorter. The quality, as well as the length of the focus, improves with practice.

Examples of meditations in this category include some forms of Zen practice, Metta Meditation, Chakra Meditation, Kundalini Meditation, Sound Meditation, Mantra Meditation, Pranayama, some forms of Qi Gong.

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02

Spatial attention

In this type of meditation, attention is not focused on any object. Instead, it remains open observing every aspect of our experience without judgment or attachment. All experiences whether internal (thoughts, sensations, memories, emotions, etc.) or external (sound, smell, etc.) are recognized and perceived as they are. This is the process of perceiving without automatically reacting to the content of the experience moment to moment without identifying.

Examples of meditations in this category include mindfulness meditation, Vipassana, some forms of Taoist meditation.

03

Effortless presence

Here the attention is not focused on anything in particular. It is directed toward the self. This experience is marked by silence, emptiness, continuity, and grounding in oneself. This state can be called the experience of pure presence. This is the real purpose behind all kinds of meditation. The previous meditation techniques of focused attention and open observation of the content of the experience are only means to an end. With them, we train the mind so that we can more often experience effortless inner silence and discover deeper states of consciousness.

Eventually, all meditation techniques are dropped and we spend more and more time in a state of pure presence/awareness. Examples of meditations in this category include effortless mindfulness meditation, self-discovery meditation (Ramana Maharishi), Dzogchen, Mahamudra, some Taoist meditations, and advanced forms of Raja Yoga.

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Types of meditation

Did you know that there are as many meditation techniques as there are sports disciplines?

Different types of meditation have different benefits and qualities. Some of these techniques will work better for you than others – just like sports disciplines or diets. They work in different ways for different people. Everyone has their own preferences and needs, even here among Yogilab members.

The only way to find the best forms of meditation for you is to try some of them out.

We can classify types of meditation in different ways.

Researchers most often classify them based on how and where we focus our attention. According to this approach, we can split the types of meditation into:

  1. Focused attention
  2. Spatial attention
  3. Effortless presence

Focused attention :

This type of meditation involves focusing your attention on one object during a meditation session. This object can be the breath, a mantra, a visualized object, a part of the body, an external object, etc. With time and practice, the ability to maintain attention on the chosen object becomes stronger and the distractions become weaker and shorter. The quality, as well as the length of the focus, improves with practice.

Examples of meditations in this category include some forms of Zen practice, Metta Meditation, Chakra Meditation, Kundalini Meditation, Sound Meditation, Mantra Meditation, Pranayama, some forms of Qi Gong.

Spatial attention

In this type of meditation, attention is not focused on any object. Instead, it remains open observing every aspect of our experience without judgment or attachment. All experiences whether internal (thoughts, sensations, memories, emotions, etc.) or external (sound, smell, etc.) are recognized and perceived as they are. This is the process of perceiving without automatically reacting to the content of the experience moment to moment without identifying.

Examples of meditations in this category include mindfulness meditation, Vipassana, some forms of Taoist meditation.

Effortless presence

Here the attention is not focused on anything in particular. It is directed toward the self. This experience is marked by silence, emptiness, continuity, and grounding in oneself. This state can be called the experience of pure presence.

This is the real purpose behind all kinds of meditation. The previous meditation techniques of focused attention and open observation of the content of the experience are only means to an end. With them, we train the mind so that we can more often experience effortless inner silence and discover deeper states of consciousness.

Eventually, all meditation techniques are dropped and we spend more and more time in a state of pure presence/awareness.

Examples of meditations in this category include effortless mindfulness meditation, self-discovery meditation (Ramana Maharishi), Dzogchen, Mahamudra, some Taoist meditations, and advanced forms of Raja Yoga.

July 2021 Vipassana The Istana TOM06941 (2) (1)-min

Meditation techniques – Find the best way to meditate for you

Zen Meditation

Zazen from Japanese means sitting meditation. It has its roots in the Chinese tradition of Buddhism (6th century AD). In the West, the most popular comes from Dogen Zenji (1200 ~ 1253), the founder of the Soto Zen movement in Japan.

Zen meditation is usually practiced seated with crossed legs. You sit on the floor using a mat and cushion for comfort. You can also meditate using a chair. The most important aspect is to keep the back straight from the pelvis to the neck. The mouth is closed and the gaze is slightly directed downward.

Is this practice for me?

Zen is a popular Buddhist meditation technique and is usually practiced at Zen Buddhist centers with a lot of community support. When practicing in a community, you may find that this type of meditation is combined with other elements of Buddhist teachings such as bowing, ritual elements, chanting, and group readings of the Buddha’s words. Some people might like that and some people might not.

Vipassana Meditation

Vipassana is a Pali word that means “insight” or “clear seeing”. It is a traditional Buddhist practice, dating back to the 6th century BC. Vipassana meditation originated in the Theravada Buddhist tradition and was spread by S.N. Goenka and his community. It is now taught worldwide in 10-day courses. It is not associated with any religious movement and its purpose is to clear the mind, achieve happiness and peace, regardless of circumstances.

Is this practice for me?

Vipassana meditation is an excellent practice to help you settle into your body and understand how your mind works. It is a very popular style of meditation, and there are more than 200 Dhamma centers all over the world where you can practice in a community. Yogilab is offering online Vipassana meditation retreats every month for free, as well as a couple of times a year in the Istana, the Yogilab headquarters in Bali, Indonesia.

Vipassana is practiced without the extra rituals found in other meditation techniques. If you are at the beginning of your meditation journey, Vipassana is a great way to learn the basics of meditation and get you going in the right direction. It also helps to build a meditative routine.

Mindfulness Meditation

The roots of this mindful meditation technique come from traditional Buddhist meditation practices. One of the leading people who have been influential in popularizing mindfulness meditation in the Western world is John Kabat-Zinn. He created a stress reduction program based on mindfulness meditation (MBSR). Mindfulness meditation is the practice of focusing on and accepting the present moment. In this technique, we concentrate on bodily sensations, thoughts, and emotions, but most importantly we practice a non-judgmental way of observing.

Is this practice for me?

For most people, this technique may be the best choice to get started with meditation. This type of meditation is probably the most widely taught in schools and health centers.

Metta Meditation

Metta is a Pali word that means kindness, goodness, goodwill. While practicing, you develop feelings of unconditional love in your mind and body. It starts with the development of compassion towards yourself, and then gradually towards other people and beings at large.

Is this practice for me?

Are you struggling to forgive someone? Are you too critical of yourself or others? Maybe you just want to have better relationships with others? Then this is the perfect meditation for you. It will help you become more kind and gentle with yourself and everyone around you. It will help you increase your level of happiness, and spread it to whoever comes in contact with you.

Mantra Meditation

A mantra is a transcendental sound vibration. “Man” means “mind” and “tra” means “to elevate.” So a mantra is a sound that elevates our mind above the material dimension. Mantra cannot be made up. It is a spiritual meditation. An eternally existing, sound vibration transmitted from time immemorial by meditation masters belonging to a long line of teachers and disciples.

Listening to this sound and repeating it, we experience that our heart and mind gradually become purified so that with each passing day we become more and more aware of our true identity – more joyful, happy, and free from anxiety.

Is this practice for me?

As with most meditation practices, this technique is practiced in a sitting position. Once you have the right posture, then you repeat the mantra inside your mind over and over throughout the entire session. Focusing on the mantra can be easier than focusing on the breath. Our attention may stay on the word more easily and wanders less than it does on the breath. This type of practice can be especially helpful when your mind is bogged down with many thoughts.

Transcendental Meditation

This meditation is a specific variety of mantra meditation. It gained fame in the 1960s and 1970s with The Beatles, The Beach Boys, and other celebrities. Transcendental Meditation is not taught in a free form. It can only be learned for a fee and only by licensed teachers. Like we just mentioned, transcendental Meditation contains elements of mantra meditation. The recommended practice is 15-20 minutes of meditation twice a day.

Is this practice for me?

This practice primarily focuses on relaxation and calming the mind. If this is your main goal when it comes to practicing meditation, this may be the technique for you.

Yoga Meditation

Yoga means “oneness.” It is the oldest meditative tradition on Earth and also has one of the widest range of practices available. The Yoga tradition dates all the way back to 1700 B.C., and its goal is spiritual purification and self-awareness. The most popular and universal meditation in Yoga is the Third Eye Meditation. Other popular practices involve focusing on the chakras, repeating mantras, visualizing light, or concentrating on an external object.

Is this practice for me?

Given the number of meditation practices available in the Yoga tradition, you are sure to find one that suits you. Probably the simplest of the meditations listed would be the Third Eye Meditation. The results of this meditation come quite quickly and it’s also fairly easy to do. Practicing Pranayama (breathing exercises) goes hand in hand with all yogic practices.

Self-Enquiry Meditation

Self-enquiry is the translation of the Sanskrit expression atma vichara. It means to investigate/find out our true nature. It aims at answering the ultimate question “Who am I? At the end of this path is the realization of who we really are and knowing our true essence. This technique is very simple, but at the same time very subtle and can look quite abstract. In the Self-inquiry method, we ask ourselves questions to deepen our understanding of our true nature and identity. You must reject any verbal answer that may come to you and use this tool to look deeper beyond labels.

Is this practice for me?

This meditation is very powerful for discovering your inner freedom and peace as you no longer chase the realization of the truth. However, if you have no previous experience with meditation this method may be too difficult for you.

Taoist Meditation

Taoism is a Chinese philosophy and religion dating back to the life of Lao Tzu. The emphasis in this philosophy is on living in harmony with Nature or the Tao. The main focus of this type of meditation is to produce, transform and clear the circulation of internal energy. The goal is to calm the body and mind, to unite body and spirit, to find inner peace and harmony with the Tao.

There are several different types of Taoist meditation and they are sometimes divided into three: “insight”, “concentration”, and “visualization”. Most of these meditations are practiced in a cross-legged sit on the floor, with a straight back. The eyes are half-closed and pointed toward the tip of the nose.

Is this practice for me?

People who are more connected to the body and nature may like to try Taoist meditation. It may also be interesting to draw on the teachings and philosophy behind it. Also, if you are interested in martial arts or Tai Chi, this approach may appeal to you. However, there are fewer Taoist centers and teachers than Buddhist or Yoga, so following this path may be more challenging.

Qi gong Meditation

Qi gong is a Chinese word that means “cultivation of vital energy” and is both a physical and mental practice. It is used in health, meditation, and martial arts training. It usually involves slow body movement, concentration, and regulated breathing. It was traditionally practiced and taught in secret in Chinese Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions. Thousands of different Qi gong exercises have been cataloged, covering over 80 different types of breathing. Some are specific to martial arts (to invigorate and strengthen the body), others are for health (to nourish bodily functions or treat disease), and others are for meditation and spiritual expansion. Qi gong can be practiced in a static position (sitting or standing) or through a dynamic set of movements. Exercises that are done as meditation are usually done in a sitting position and without movement.

Is this practice for me?

Qi gong meditation may be more appealing to people who like to incorporate more active bodywork and energy into the practice. If a sitting meditation is unappealing to you and you prefer something more active, try some of the more dynamic forms of Qi gong.

Guided Meditation

Guided meditation is very much a phenomenon of modern times. It is the easiest way to start meditating. When you choose guided meditations, you can find practices from the various traditions described above. The best-guided meditation is usually in audio form, or sometimes audio and video.

Is this practice for me?

If you feel that traditional meditation is a bit too difficult or you’re not sure where to start, guided meditations can be a way to begin your meditation adventure. If you’re looking for a very specific experience or benefit – like improving your self-esteem, working through a trauma, or simply releasing tension in your body – you can also easily find a meditation to help you with that.

Christian Meditation

In Eastern traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Daoism) meditation is usually practiced to transcend the mind and achieve enlightenment. In the Christian tradition, on the other hand, the purpose of contemplative practices can be said to be moral cleansing and a deeper understanding of the Bible, or a closer intimacy with God/Christ, for the more mystical stream of that tradition.

Here are some forms of Christian contemplative practice:

  • Contemplative prayer – which usually involves the silent repetition of sacred words or phrases, with emphasis and devotion.
  • Contemplative reading – or simply “contemplation,” which involves thinking deeply about the teachings and events of the Bible.
  • “Sitting with God” – silent meditation, usually preceded by contemplation or reading, in which we focus our whole mind, heart, and soul on the presence of God.

Sufi Meditation

Sufism is an esoteric path in Islam whose goal is to purify oneself and achieve mystical union with the Supreme (called Allah in this tradition). Practitioners of Sufism are called Sufis and follow a variety of spiritual practices, many of which were influenced by the yoga tradition in India.

Their main meditation techniques include:

Here are some forms of Christian contemplative practice:

  • Contemplation of God (muraqabah)
  • Sufi Mantra meditation (zikr, jikr or dhikr)
  • Heartbeat meditation
  • Sufi breathing meditation (including breathing the five elements)
  • Loving Bond Meditation
  • Staring meditation
  • Walking meditation
  • Whirling Sufi

Meditation techniques – Find the best way to meditate for you

Zen Meditation

Zazen from Japanese means sitting meditation. It has its roots in the Chinese tradition of Buddhism (6th century AD). In the West, the most popular comes from Dogen Zenji (1200 ~ 1253), the founder of the Soto Zen movement in Japan.

Zen meditation is usually practiced seated with crossed legs. You sit on the floor using a mat and cushion for comfort. You can also meditate using a chair. The most important aspect is to keep the back straight from the pelvis to the neck. The mouth is closed and the gaze is slightly directed downward.

Is this practice for me?

Zen is a popular Buddhist meditation technique and is usually practiced at Zen Buddhist centers with a lot of community support. When practicing in a community, you may find that this type of meditation is combined with other elements of Buddhist teachings such as bowing, ritual elements, chanting, and group readings of the Buddha’s words. Some people might like that and some people might not.

Vipassana Meditation

Vipassana is a Pali word that means “insight” or “clear seeing”. It is a traditional Buddhist practice, dating back to the 6th century BC. Vipassana meditation originated in the Theravada Buddhist tradition and was spread by S.N. Goenka and his community.

It is now taught worldwide in 10-day courses. It is not associated with any religious movement and its purpose is to clear the mind, achieve happiness and peace, regardless of circumstances.

Is this practice for me?

Vipassana meditation is an excellent practice to help you settle into your body and understand how your mind works. It is a very popular style of meditation, and there are more than 200 Dhamma centers all over the world where you can practice in a community.

Yogilab is offering online Vipassana meditation retreats every month for free, as well as a couple of times a year in the Istana, the Yogilab headquarters in Bali, Indonesia.

Vipassana is practiced without the extra rituals found in other meditation techniques. If you are at the beginning of your meditation journey, Vipassana is a great way to learn the basics of meditation and get you going in the right direction. It also helps to build a meditative routine.

Mindfulness Meditation

The roots of this mindful meditation technique come from traditional Buddhist meditation practices. One of the leading people who have been influential in popularizing mindfulness meditation in the Western world is John Kabat-Zinn. He created a stress reduction program based on mindfulness meditation (MBSR).

Mindfulness meditation is the practice of focusing on and accepting the present moment. In this technique, we concentrate on bodily sensations, thoughts, and emotions, but most importantly we practice a non-judgmental way of observing.

Is this practice for me?

For most people, this technique may be the best choice to get started with meditation. This type of meditation is probably the most widely taught in schools and health centers.

Metta Meditation

Metta is a Pali word that means kindness, goodness, goodwill. While practicing, you develop feelings of unconditional love in your mind and body. It starts with the development of compassion towards yourself, and then gradually towards other people and beings at large.

Is this practice for me?

Are you struggling to forgive someone? Are you too critical of yourself or others? Maybe you just want to have better relationships with others? Then this is the perfect meditation for you. It will help you become more kind and gentle with yourself and everyone around you. It will help you increase your level of happiness, and spread it to whoever comes in contact with you.

Mantra Meditation

A mantra is a transcendental sound vibration. “Man” means “mind” and “tra” means “to elevate.” So a mantra is a sound that elevates our mind above the material dimension.

Mantra cannot be made up. It is a spiritual meditation. An eternally existing, sound vibration transmitted from time immemorial by meditation masters belonging to a long line of teachers and disciples.

Listening to this sound and repeating it, we experience that our heart and mind gradually become purified so that with each passing day we become more and more aware of our true identity – more joyful, happy, and free from anxiety.

Is this practice for me?

As with most meditation practices, this technique is practiced in a sitting position. Once you have the right posture, then you repeat the mantra inside your mind over and over throughout the entire session.

Focusing on the mantra can be easier than focusing on the breath. Our attention may stay on the word more easily and wanders less than it does on the breath. This type of practice can be especially helpful when your mind is bogged down with many thoughts.

Transcendental Meditation

This meditation is a specific variety of mantra meditation. It gained fame in the 1960s and 1970s with The Beatles, The Beach Boys, and other celebrities.

Transcendental Meditation is not taught in a free form. It can only be learned for a fee and only by licensed teachers. Like we just mentioned, transcendental Meditation contains elements of mantra meditation. The recommended practice is 15-20 minutes of meditation twice a day.

Is this practice for me?

This practice primarily focuses on relaxation and calming the mind. If this is your main goal when it comes to practicing meditation, this may be the technique for you.

Yoga Meditation

Yoga means “oneness.” It is the oldest meditative tradition on Earth and also has one of the widest range of practices available. The Yoga tradition dates all the way back to 1700 B.C., and its goal is spiritual purification and self-awareness.

The most popular and universal meditation in Yoga is the Third Eye Meditation. Other popular practices involve focusing on the chakras, repeating mantras, visualizing light, or concentrating on an external object.

Is this practice for me?

Given the number of meditation practices available in the Yoga tradition, you are sure to find one that suits you. Probably the simplest of the meditations listed would be the Third Eye Meditation. The results of this meditation come quite quickly and it’s also fairly easy to do. Practicing Pranayama (breathing exercises) goes hand in hand with all yogic practices.

Yoga Meditation

Yoga means “oneness.” It is the oldest meditative tradition on Earth and also has one of the widest range of practices available. The Yoga tradition dates all the way back to 1700 B.C., and its goal is spiritual purification and self-awareness.

The most popular and universal meditation in Yoga is the Third Eye Meditation. Other popular practices involve focusing on the chakras, repeating mantras, visualizing light, or concentrating on an external object.

Is this practice for me?

Given the number of meditation practices available in the Yoga tradition, you are sure to find one that suits you. Probably the simplest of the meditations listed would be the Third Eye Meditation. The results of this meditation come quite quickly and it’s also fairly easy to do. Practicing Pranayama (breathing exercises) goes hand in hand with all yogic practices.

Self-Enquiry Meditation

Self-enquiry is the translation of the Sanskrit expression atma vichara. It means to investigate/find out our true nature. It aims at answering the ultimate question “Who am I? At the end of this path is the realization of who we really are and knowing our true essence.

This technique is very simple, but at the same time very subtle and can look quite abstract. In the Self-inquiry method, we ask ourselves questions to deepen our understanding of our true nature and identity. You must reject any verbal answer that may come to you and use this tool to look deeper beyond labels.

Is this practice for me?

This meditation is very powerful for discovering your inner freedom and peace as you no longer chase the realization of the truth. However, if you have no previous experience with meditation this method may be too difficult for you.

Taoist Meditation

Taoism is a Chinese philosophy and religion dating back to the life of Lao Tzu. The emphasis in this philosophy is on living in harmony with Nature or the Tao.

The main focus of this type of meditation is to produce, transform and clear the circulation of internal energy. The goal is to calm the body and mind, to unite body and spirit, to find inner peace and harmony with the Tao.

There are several different types of Taoist meditation and they are sometimes divided into three: “insight”, “concentration”, and “visualization”. Most of these meditations are practiced in a cross-legged sit on the floor, with a straight back. The eyes are half-closed and pointed toward the tip of the nose.

People who are more connected to the body and nature may like to try Taoist meditation. It may also be interesting to draw on the teachings and philosophy behind it.

Also, if you are interested in martial arts or Tai Chi, this approach may appeal to you. However, there are fewer Taoist centers and teachers than Buddhist or Yoga, so following this path may be more challenging.

Qi gong Meditation

Qi gong is a Chinese word that means “cultivation of vital energy” and is both a physical and mental practice. It is used in health, meditation, and martial arts training. It usually involves slow body movement, concentration, and regulated breathing. It was traditionally practiced and taught in secret in Chinese Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian traditions.

Thousands of different Qi gong exercises have been cataloged, covering over 80 different types of breathing. Some are specific to martial arts (to invigorate and strengthen the body), others are for health (to nourish bodily functions or treat disease), and others are for meditation and spiritual expansion.

Qi gong can be practiced in a static position (sitting or standing) or through a dynamic set of movements. Exercises that are done as meditation are usually done in a sitting position and without movement.

Is this practice for me?

Qi gong meditation may be more appealing to people who like to incorporate more active bodywork and energy into the practice. If a sitting meditation is unappealing to you and you prefer something more active, try some of the more dynamic forms of Qi gong.

Guided Meditation

Guided meditation is very much a phenomenon of modern times. It is the easiest way to start meditating. When you choose guided meditations, you can find practices from the various traditions described above. The best-guided meditation is usually in audio form, or sometimes audio and video.

Is this practice for me?

If you feel that traditional meditation is a bit too difficult or you’re not sure where to start, guided meditations can be a way to begin your meditation adventure.

If you’re looking for a very specific experience or benefit – like improving your self-esteem, working through a trauma, or simply releasing tension in your body – you can also easily find a meditation to help you with that.

Christian Meditation

In Eastern traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Daoism) meditation is usually practiced to transcend the mind and achieve enlightenment. In the Christian tradition, on the other hand, the purpose of contemplative practices can be said to be moral cleansing and a deeper understanding of the Bible, or a closer intimacy with God/Christ, for the more mystical stream of that tradition.

Here are some forms of Christian contemplative practice:

  • Contemplative prayer – which usually involves the silent repetition of sacred words or phrases, with emphasis and devotion.
  • Contemplative reading – or simply “contemplation,” which involves thinking deeply about the teachings and events of the Bible.
  • “Sitting with God” – silent meditation, usually preceded by contemplation or reading, in which we focus our whole mind, heart, and soul on the presence of God.

Sufi Meditation

Sufism is an esoteric path in Islam whose goal is to purify oneself and achieve mystical union with the Supreme (called Allah in this tradition). Practitioners of Sufism are called Sufis and follow a variety of spiritual practices, many of which were influenced by the yoga tradition in India.

Their main meditation techniques include:

  • Contemplation of God (muraqabah)
  • Sufi Mantra meditation (zikr, jikr or dhikr)
  • Heartbeat meditation
  • Sufi breathing meditation (including breathing the five elements)
  • Loving Bond Meditation
  • Staring meditation
  • Walking meditation
  • Whirling Sufi

What are your favorite types of meditation?

With all these available meditation types, different ways to meditate, and the many nuances between them, you are sure to find a practice you will like. You can try out some of these practices on your own and see how they work for you.

Also, try to find a teacher that you can connect with, as this can make a huge difference in your meditation journey. Get to know different meditation teachers and groups. See what impact the practice has had on them. It is important to find the right meditation technique for you.

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